Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
About Photography / Professional Senior Member Timothy Sim26/Male/Singapore Groups :iconthecorrespondent: TheCorrespondent
Photojournalism Group
Recent Activity
Deviant for 6 Years
Premium Member 'til Hell freezes over
Statistics 676 Deviations 7,183 Comments 201,490 Pageviews

Newest Deviations

Deviousness Award

Deviousness Award
^Timothy-Sim is a shining example of what it takes to be a true deviant. His dedication and commitment to being the very best, super friendly personality combined with finely crafted photography skills have earned him not just a place in our hearts, but a foot firmly on what is sure to be a professional career glittered with success. Timothy always goes above and beyond to help others improve, taking time out to connect with our community. ^Timothy-Sim is well known for always displaying such a humble good natured approach to others. So, it's for all this and more that we are delighted to congratulate Timothy for being the recipient of the final Deviousness Award for 2010.
-awarded December 2010

Wishlist

Visitors

The month of May is dedicated to photojournalism, and I am thankful to have the opportunity to share my experiences in the field and encourage you to the notion that photojournalism isn't as hard as we think it is.

ABOUT ME

I am currently working in my fifth year as a pictures editor at the Reuters Global Picture Desk in Singapore. Occasionally, when the local photographer is not available, I step in to cover news in his capacity.

Reuters is a global news network that provides pictures, videos and news to the rest of the world, similar to other agencies such as AP, AFP, EPA and Getty Images.

I've also been a CV for the photojournalism gallery here on deviartART. Nice to meet you!

YOU ASKED, I ANSWER

As briefly as possible, I will answer a few questions that have been posed in the matter of photojournalism, and in the process, expand a little with the knowledge and experience I have, personally, and with working with photographers in the field.

The first thing I want to tackle is:

:bulletred: Can ANYONE be a photojournalist?
The hard and fast answer is NO. It takes a lot of guts to shoot things that can be ethically and morally grey, but knowing that you need to do it so that the world will understand the truth of it is one step to it. But until that's really your job to do it, I'd always recommend leaving it to the professionals.

The soft and polite answer is YES. In the form of Citizen Journalism.

There is, however, a difference between Photojournalism and Citizen Journalism.
Photojournalism is all about documentation. Citizen Journalism is about the citizens capturing and contributing to the news. While I appreciate the timeliness of citizen journalism and how it IS the fastest way today, faster than waiting for the local news photographer to get there, I am not fond of it. It undermines and disrupts real photojournalists' works - and sometimes, their careers (think, the Chicago Sun-Times). Citizen Journalists, can also be, if they are not careful, wannabes who get in the way of the people trying to do their jobs, cluttering the field and on occasion, becoming a liability when they fail to adhere to rules and incur accidents. They are the equivalents of newbies who spoil the markets in your wedding industries etc.

Now that that's put aside,

:bulletred: How do you deal with getting permission vs getting a candid photo?

In photojournalism, the only permission you get is when you're applying for the pass to a particular event. Everything else must be candid and unposed. If not, it would not be considered photojournalism, because photojournalism is about unbiased documenting of an event unfolding before the photographer's eyes. 
However, if someone does not like what I shoot and comes over to insist I delete the pictures, I first explain my position and if needed, show them the picture. If they continue to insist, I simply delete it and/or walk away. There is nothing they can do to stop you unless you have infringed their personal space. Photojournalists are not the paparazzi, who would basically get into personal space just for a shot that has a motive to the angle of their story.

:bulletred: Have you ever been in a dangerous situation where you were worried about being attacked for your camera?

In sunny Singapore, cases like these happening would be close to nil. The closest I've gotten was an old lady just about to throw a cardboard box at me for unnecessarily tailing her for a block just to get a shot. Again, in this case, I was infringing her personal space. 
Good Hope by Timothy-Sim

What I can share in my time as an editor, are stories from my photojournalist colleagues from around the world:

Colleague 1: Greece riots. Had a molotov cocktail thrown at him while he was shooting.
Colleague 2: Turkey protests. A demonstrator attacked him with a stick as he was shooting.
Colleague 3: Greece riots. Witnessed another agency's photographer's camera taken by the police and then smashed.
I mean, I could go on, but you would realise that most of this happens during demonstrations and protests when in the heat of the moment, for reasons that the protestors or the police do not want their pictures taken during the process, attack the photographer covering the event to prevent the action from being documented. 
In times like these, safety is of utmost concern for my colleagues. Tear gas masks and bulletproof vests are worn, most of them start off shooting from behind the police line in case things get violent from the get-go. But when things get hot, and the photographer and his/her camera are in possible jeopardy, safety comes first. It would be wiser to escape the scene without the picture, or to lose the camera in the process, than to be beaten up, arrested or killed.


:bulletred: When covering an event, how do you ensure that you get that perfect shot? How do you plan for a special event?

In my personal capacity as a photojournalist, it always boils down to a few things.

1) MAINTAIN. Always ensure your gear are in tip-top shape. Lens are cleaned and maintained, body sensors clear of dust-spots and media credentials are not expired. Before leaving the house, ensure your CF/SD cards are in the body (I have gone to an event [early, thank goodness] and realised enroute that I forgot to put my CF cards in. Had to go back to get them).

2) RESEARCH. Can't underline anymore of how important it is. Know what event you're going for. What lenses do you require? Where are you positioned or where do you plan to be at? What might happen in a best or worst case scenario? Do you have a point A to point B escape route or way to get there before something else happens?
In most cases, a wide (24-70mm) and a long (70-200mm) will suffice and do the trick. But for other cases like soccer matches or general sports for that matter when you're positioned far from the action, these lenses are good, but you will require more firepower. 300mm or 100-400mm lenses are required. Knowing what you need ahead of time will give you the edge when you're there because you're already mentally prepared.
Knowing the fastest and most efficient way to get out of a location can also be handy. It could beat the crowd, and in some sense, in other cases, save your life if something disastrous happens. It also helps to know where's the best spot to have wifi, or to be armed with it well. On the wire with news photographers, you want to get out as fast as possible, set up base and beat your competition to filing your pictures first to the wire before they do, to get as much play as possible.

3) IMPROVISE. Sometimes you don't get what you want or can't get the position you want best. What to do? Having a plan is one thing, but being able to adapt when the plan doesn't happen is also equally important.


I'll give two personal example of the importance of research and improvisation.

Lee Kuan Yew 3 by Timothy-Sim
When Singapore's first Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew died, I had already gotten the main shot I needed at the parliament house of the flag at half mast at dawn. However, I wanted to get an immediate reaction from a school that was having a flag-raising ceremony that also had that as a variation. In the hour that I had before the first shot, I plotted my route, and re-entry back into the city to shoot the arrival of the hearse and the local reactions to the newspapers, giving buffer time to the traffic, getting another cab and where exactly the school was.
What I did not plan was that the school would turn me down and tell me I needed permission to get in (oh of course, but when you need the shot now, you don't have time for permission for something as trivial as that right?)

So I improvised and asked the teacher who had turned me away if they would stop me if I shot from outside of the school, which was naturally out of their jurisdiction. Naturally, they wouldn't have been able to stop me. So I shot through the fence. I hadn't planned for that, but to get the shot, I needed to adapt. I got it, and buzzed over to my next destination.

Lee Kuan Yew 2 by Timothy-Sim


Another assignment I was on was the recent Singapore Fashion Week.
It was my first time ever shooting a fashion runway show. The first thing I did was to research on all the pictures taken at fashion runways. How long is it? How many models roughly? How long does it take to run? How long is each show? Is there a lighting test and is it consistent? When does the designer appear and what are his/her quirks?

Having that all down, I made it a point to come EARLY for my assignment, to test the light, get my settings down and most importantly, mark my spot at the designated media area, so that no one would steal my spot when the show started.

Did things go to plan during the show? Yes. Most of it boiled down to me knowing what I needed to shoot, and once I got that, then I could get creative.

Singapore Fashion Week 1 by Timothy-Sim

Once I had my shots in the bag, it was down to Victoria Beckham to appear. What I knew through my research was that she was a coy person who didn't like to be seen or pictured often. What I didn't know, was how she was going to appear and for how long, at the end of her show.

Knowing this, I had to quickly adapt my lens for the worst case scenario. Trained at the entrance of the runway, would she make a full appearance? Or simply peek out to acknowledge the crowd?

Sure enough, she appeared. For perhaps 20 seconds to receive a bouquet of flowers and then waving before disappearing into the backstage. 

One major shot taken and in that fleeting moment, she was gone.

Singapore Fashion Week 2 by Timothy-Sim

For a first time shooting an event I had not covered before, I would say I did a decently good job. And it always boiled down to being prepared and adapting where needed.

-

I hope my experiences have helped. Can you do the same as a photographer? Very much so. Feel free to ask if you have any questions! I will be glad to answer them.

My best,
Timothy-Sim 



deviantID

Timothy-Sim
Timothy Sim
Artist | Professional | Photography
Singapore
Timothy Sim currently works for Reuters as a Sub-Editor at the Global Pictures Desk

He graduated from Ngee Ann Polytechnic's Mass Communication with a Journalism Major.

Picking up a film camera for the first time in the last year of his school term during a photojournalism class, Timothy fell in love with the brilliance of capturing the essence expressions and emotions of people.

Alongside his military experience, He has since covered various photo-journalistic fields such as weddings and concerts and performances.

To Timothy, passion is the purest form of emotion that keeps him going, transforming hobby into profession.

Timothy has worked as a photojournalist with Singapore's Military Magazine, Pioneer Magazine while serving his National Service.

-


You can view Timothy's Photo Documentaries at Fotologue and Portfolio at timothysim.com.
Interests

Activity


The month of May is dedicated to photojournalism, and I am thankful to have the opportunity to share my experiences in the field and encourage you to the notion that photojournalism isn't as hard as we think it is.

ABOUT ME

I am currently working in my fifth year as a pictures editor at the Reuters Global Picture Desk in Singapore. Occasionally, when the local photographer is not available, I step in to cover news in his capacity.

Reuters is a global news network that provides pictures, videos and news to the rest of the world, similar to other agencies such as AP, AFP, EPA and Getty Images.

I've also been a CV for the photojournalism gallery here on deviartART. Nice to meet you!

YOU ASKED, I ANSWER

As briefly as possible, I will answer a few questions that have been posed in the matter of photojournalism, and in the process, expand a little with the knowledge and experience I have, personally, and with working with photographers in the field.

The first thing I want to tackle is:

:bulletred: Can ANYONE be a photojournalist?
The hard and fast answer is NO. It takes a lot of guts to shoot things that can be ethically and morally grey, but knowing that you need to do it so that the world will understand the truth of it is one step to it. But until that's really your job to do it, I'd always recommend leaving it to the professionals.

The soft and polite answer is YES. In the form of Citizen Journalism.

There is, however, a difference between Photojournalism and Citizen Journalism.
Photojournalism is all about documentation. Citizen Journalism is about the citizens capturing and contributing to the news. While I appreciate the timeliness of citizen journalism and how it IS the fastest way today, faster than waiting for the local news photographer to get there, I am not fond of it. It undermines and disrupts real photojournalists' works - and sometimes, their careers (think, the Chicago Sun-Times). Citizen Journalists, can also be, if they are not careful, wannabes who get in the way of the people trying to do their jobs, cluttering the field and on occasion, becoming a liability when they fail to adhere to rules and incur accidents. They are the equivalents of newbies who spoil the markets in your wedding industries etc.

Now that that's put aside,

:bulletred: How do you deal with getting permission vs getting a candid photo?

In photojournalism, the only permission you get is when you're applying for the pass to a particular event. Everything else must be candid and unposed. If not, it would not be considered photojournalism, because photojournalism is about unbiased documenting of an event unfolding before the photographer's eyes. 
However, if someone does not like what I shoot and comes over to insist I delete the pictures, I first explain my position and if needed, show them the picture. If they continue to insist, I simply delete it and/or walk away. There is nothing they can do to stop you unless you have infringed their personal space. Photojournalists are not the paparazzi, who would basically get into personal space just for a shot that has a motive to the angle of their story.

:bulletred: Have you ever been in a dangerous situation where you were worried about being attacked for your camera?

In sunny Singapore, cases like these happening would be close to nil. The closest I've gotten was an old lady just about to throw a cardboard box at me for unnecessarily tailing her for a block just to get a shot. Again, in this case, I was infringing her personal space. 
Good Hope by Timothy-Sim

What I can share in my time as an editor, are stories from my photojournalist colleagues from around the world:

Colleague 1: Greece riots. Had a molotov cocktail thrown at him while he was shooting.
Colleague 2: Turkey protests. A demonstrator attacked him with a stick as he was shooting.
Colleague 3: Greece riots. Witnessed another agency's photographer's camera taken by the police and then smashed.
I mean, I could go on, but you would realise that most of this happens during demonstrations and protests when in the heat of the moment, for reasons that the protestors or the police do not want their pictures taken during the process, attack the photographer covering the event to prevent the action from being documented. 
In times like these, safety is of utmost concern for my colleagues. Tear gas masks and bulletproof vests are worn, most of them start off shooting from behind the police line in case things get violent from the get-go. But when things get hot, and the photographer and his/her camera are in possible jeopardy, safety comes first. It would be wiser to escape the scene without the picture, or to lose the camera in the process, than to be beaten up, arrested or killed.


:bulletred: When covering an event, how do you ensure that you get that perfect shot? How do you plan for a special event?

In my personal capacity as a photojournalist, it always boils down to a few things.

1) MAINTAIN. Always ensure your gear are in tip-top shape. Lens are cleaned and maintained, body sensors clear of dust-spots and media credentials are not expired. Before leaving the house, ensure your CF/SD cards are in the body (I have gone to an event [early, thank goodness] and realised enroute that I forgot to put my CF cards in. Had to go back to get them).

2) RESEARCH. Can't underline anymore of how important it is. Know what event you're going for. What lenses do you require? Where are you positioned or where do you plan to be at? What might happen in a best or worst case scenario? Do you have a point A to point B escape route or way to get there before something else happens?
In most cases, a wide (24-70mm) and a long (70-200mm) will suffice and do the trick. But for other cases like soccer matches or general sports for that matter when you're positioned far from the action, these lenses are good, but you will require more firepower. 300mm or 100-400mm lenses are required. Knowing what you need ahead of time will give you the edge when you're there because you're already mentally prepared.
Knowing the fastest and most efficient way to get out of a location can also be handy. It could beat the crowd, and in some sense, in other cases, save your life if something disastrous happens. It also helps to know where's the best spot to have wifi, or to be armed with it well. On the wire with news photographers, you want to get out as fast as possible, set up base and beat your competition to filing your pictures first to the wire before they do, to get as much play as possible.

3) IMPROVISE. Sometimes you don't get what you want or can't get the position you want best. What to do? Having a plan is one thing, but being able to adapt when the plan doesn't happen is also equally important.


I'll give two personal example of the importance of research and improvisation.

Lee Kuan Yew 3 by Timothy-Sim
When Singapore's first Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew died, I had already gotten the main shot I needed at the parliament house of the flag at half mast at dawn. However, I wanted to get an immediate reaction from a school that was having a flag-raising ceremony that also had that as a variation. In the hour that I had before the first shot, I plotted my route, and re-entry back into the city to shoot the arrival of the hearse and the local reactions to the newspapers, giving buffer time to the traffic, getting another cab and where exactly the school was.
What I did not plan was that the school would turn me down and tell me I needed permission to get in (oh of course, but when you need the shot now, you don't have time for permission for something as trivial as that right?)

So I improvised and asked the teacher who had turned me away if they would stop me if I shot from outside of the school, which was naturally out of their jurisdiction. Naturally, they wouldn't have been able to stop me. So I shot through the fence. I hadn't planned for that, but to get the shot, I needed to adapt. I got it, and buzzed over to my next destination.

Lee Kuan Yew 2 by Timothy-Sim


Another assignment I was on was the recent Singapore Fashion Week.
It was my first time ever shooting a fashion runway show. The first thing I did was to research on all the pictures taken at fashion runways. How long is it? How many models roughly? How long does it take to run? How long is each show? Is there a lighting test and is it consistent? When does the designer appear and what are his/her quirks?

Having that all down, I made it a point to come EARLY for my assignment, to test the light, get my settings down and most importantly, mark my spot at the designated media area, so that no one would steal my spot when the show started.

Did things go to plan during the show? Yes. Most of it boiled down to me knowing what I needed to shoot, and once I got that, then I could get creative.

Singapore Fashion Week 1 by Timothy-Sim

Once I had my shots in the bag, it was down to Victoria Beckham to appear. What I knew through my research was that she was a coy person who didn't like to be seen or pictured often. What I didn't know, was how she was going to appear and for how long, at the end of her show.

Knowing this, I had to quickly adapt my lens for the worst case scenario. Trained at the entrance of the runway, would she make a full appearance? Or simply peek out to acknowledge the crowd?

Sure enough, she appeared. For perhaps 20 seconds to receive a bouquet of flowers and then waving before disappearing into the backstage. 

One major shot taken and in that fleeting moment, she was gone.

Singapore Fashion Week 2 by Timothy-Sim

For a first time shooting an event I had not covered before, I would say I did a decently good job. And it always boiled down to being prepared and adapting where needed.

-

I hope my experiences have helped. Can you do the same as a photographer? Very much so. Feel free to ask if you have any questions! I will be glad to answer them.

My best,
Timothy-Sim 



The month of May is dedicated to photojournalism, and I am thankful to have the opportunity to share my experiences in the field and encourage you to the notion that photojournalism isn't as hard as we think it is.

ABOUT ME

I am currently working in my fifth year as a pictures editor at the Reuters Global Picture Desk in Singapore. Occasionally, when the local photographer is not available, I step in to cover news in his capacity.

Reuters is a global news network that provides pictures, videos and news to the rest of the world, similar to other agencies such as AP, AFP, EPA and Getty Images.

I've also been a CV for the photojournalism gallery here on deviartART. Nice to meet you!

YOU ASKED, I ANSWER

As briefly as possible, I will answer a few questions that have been posed in the matter of photojournalism, and in the process, expand a little with the knowledge and experience I have, personally, and with working with photographers in the field.

The first thing I want to tackle is:

:bulletred: Can ANYONE be a photojournalist?
The hard and fast answer is NO. It takes a lot of guts to shoot things that can be ethically and morally grey, but knowing that you need to do it so that the world will understand the truth of it is one step to it. But until that's really your job to do it, I'd always recommend leaving it to the professionals.

The soft and polite answer is YES. In the form of Citizen Journalism.

There is, however, a difference between Photojournalism and Citizen Journalism.
Photojournalism is all about documentation. Citizen Journalism is about the citizens capturing and contributing to the news. While I appreciate the timeliness of citizen journalism and how it IS the fastest way today, faster than waiting for the local news photographer to get there, I am not fond of it. It undermines and disrupts real photojournalists' works - and sometimes, their careers (think, the Chicago Sun-Times). Citizen Journalists, can also be, if they are not careful, wannabes who get in the way of the people trying to do their jobs, cluttering the field and on occasion, becoming a liability when they fail to adhere to rules and incur accidents. They are the equivalents of newbies who spoil the markets in your wedding industries etc.

Now that that's put aside,

:bulletred: How do you deal with getting permission vs getting a candid photo?

In photojournalism, the only permission you get is when you're applying for the pass to a particular event. Everything else must be candid and unposed. If not, it would not be considered photojournalism, because photojournalism is about unbiased documenting of an event unfolding before the photographer's eyes. 
However, if someone does not like what I shoot and comes over to insist I delete the pictures, I first explain my position and if needed, show them the picture. If they continue to insist, I simply delete it and/or walk away. There is nothing they can do to stop you unless you have infringed their personal space. Photojournalists are not the paparazzi, who would basically get into personal space just for a shot that has a motive to the angle of their story.

:bulletred: Have you ever been in a dangerous situation where you were worried about being attacked for your camera?

In sunny Singapore, cases like these happening would be close to nil. The closest I've gotten was an old lady just about to throw a cardboard box at me for unnecessarily tailing her for a block just to get a shot. Again, in this case, I was infringing her personal space. 
Good Hope by Timothy-Sim

What I can share in my time as an editor, are stories from my photojournalist colleagues from around the world:

Colleague 1: Greece riots. Had a molotov cocktail thrown at him while he was shooting.
Colleague 2: Turkey protests. A demonstrator attacked him with a stick as he was shooting.
Colleague 3: Greece riots. Witnessed another agency's photographer's camera taken by the police and then smashed.
I mean, I could go on, but you would realise that most of this happens during demonstrations and protests when in the heat of the moment, for reasons that the protestors or the police do not want their pictures taken during the process, attack the photographer covering the event to prevent the action from being documented. 
In times like these, safety is of utmost concern for my colleagues. Tear gas masks and bulletproof vests are worn, most of them start off shooting from behind the police line in case things get violent from the get-go. But when things get hot, and the photographer and his/her camera are in possible jeopardy, safety comes first. It would be wiser to escape the scene without the picture, or to lose the camera in the process, than to be beaten up, arrested or killed.


:bulletred: When covering an event, how do you ensure that you get that perfect shot? How do you plan for a special event?

In my personal capacity as a photojournalist, it always boils down to a few things.

1) MAINTAIN. Always ensure your gear are in tip-top shape. Lens are cleaned and maintained, body sensors clear of dust-spots and media credentials are not expired. Before leaving the house, ensure your CF/SD cards are in the body (I have gone to an event [early, thank goodness] and realised enroute that I forgot to put my CF cards in. Had to go back to get them).

2) RESEARCH. Can't underline anymore of how important it is. Know what event you're going for. What lenses do you require? Where are you positioned or where do you plan to be at? What might happen in a best or worst case scenario? Do you have a point A to point B escape route or way to get there before something else happens?
In most cases, a wide (24-70mm) and a long (70-200mm) will suffice and do the trick. But for other cases like soccer matches or general sports for that matter when you're positioned far from the action, these lenses are good, but you will require more firepower. 300mm or 100-400mm lenses are required. Knowing what you need ahead of time will give you the edge when you're there because you're already mentally prepared.
Knowing the fastest and most efficient way to get out of a location can also be handy. It could beat the crowd, and in some sense, in other cases, save your life if something disastrous happens. It also helps to know where's the best spot to have wifi, or to be armed with it well. On the wire with news photographers, you want to get out as fast as possible, set up base and beat your competition to filing your pictures first to the wire before they do, to get as much play as possible.

3) IMPROVISE. Sometimes you don't get what you want or can't get the position you want best. What to do? Having a plan is one thing, but being able to adapt when the plan doesn't happen is also equally important.


I'll give two personal example of the importance of research and improvisation.

Lee Kuan Yew 3 by Timothy-Sim
When Singapore's first Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew died, I had already gotten the main shot I needed at the parliament house of the flag at half mast at dawn. However, I wanted to get an immediate reaction from a school that was having a flag-raising ceremony that also had that as a variation. In the hour that I had before the first shot, I plotted my route, and re-entry back into the city to shoot the arrival of the hearse and the local reactions to the newspapers, giving buffer time to the traffic, getting another cab and where exactly the school was.
What I did not plan was that the school would turn me down and tell me I needed permission to get in (oh of course, but when you need the shot now, you don't have time for permission for something as trivial as that right?)

So I improvised and asked the teacher who had turned me away if they would stop me if I shot from outside of the school, which was naturally out of their jurisdiction. Naturally, they wouldn't have been able to stop me. So I shot through the fence. I hadn't planned for that, but to get the shot, I needed to adapt. I got it, and buzzed over to my next destination.

Lee Kuan Yew 2 by Timothy-Sim


Another assignment I was on was the recent Singapore Fashion Week.
It was my first time ever shooting a fashion runway show. The first thing I did was to research on all the pictures taken at fashion runways. How long is it? How many models roughly? How long does it take to run? How long is each show? Is there a lighting test and is it consistent? When does the designer appear and what are his/her quirks?

Having that all down, I made it a point to come EARLY for my assignment, to test the light, get my settings down and most importantly, mark my spot at the designated media area, so that no one would steal my spot when the show started.

Did things go to plan during the show? Yes. Most of it boiled down to me knowing what I needed to shoot, and once I got that, then I could get creative.

Singapore Fashion Week 1 by Timothy-Sim

Once I had my shots in the bag, it was down to Victoria Beckham to appear. What I knew through my research was that she was a coy person who didn't like to be seen or pictured often. What I didn't know, was how she was going to appear and for how long, at the end of her show.

Knowing this, I had to quickly adapt my lens for the worst case scenario. Trained at the entrance of the runway, would she make a full appearance? Or simply peek out to acknowledge the crowd?

Sure enough, she appeared. For perhaps 20 seconds to receive a bouquet of flowers and then waving before disappearing into the backstage. 

One major shot taken and in that fleeting moment, she was gone.

Singapore Fashion Week 2 by Timothy-Sim

For a first time shooting an event I had not covered before, I would say I did a decently good job. And it always boiled down to being prepared and adapting where needed.

-

I hope my experiences have helped. Can you do the same as a photographer? Very much so. Feel free to ask if you have any questions! I will be glad to answer them.

My best,
Timothy-Sim 



Singapore Fashion Week 2 by Timothy-Sim
Singapore Fashion Week 2
Designer Victoria Beckham acknowledges the crowd after presenting her Autumn/Winter 2015 collection during Singapore Fashion Week. REUTERS/Timothy Sim
Loading...

Journal History

Shoutbox

Ptollemy:iconptollemy:
HAPPY BRITHDAY! :):)
Fri Aug 9, 2013, 5:09 PM
Timothy-Sim:icontimothy-sim:
HAHA HELLO GOOD TO SEE YOU PEOPLE SHOUTING. SHOUTING BACK!
Sun Mar 3, 2013, 10:46 AM
KatiBear:iconkatibear:
I AM SHOUTING IN YOUR BOX.
Thu Feb 28, 2013, 5:11 AM
largethomas:iconlargethomas:
SHOUTBOX! Hi Tim :)
Thu Feb 28, 2013, 2:17 AM
angelStained:iconangelstained:
hello [:
Thu Jun 23, 2011, 4:18 AM
SorinDanut:iconsorindanut:
:clap:
Fri Jan 21, 2011, 1:58 AM
AliWithAnEye:iconaliwithaneye:
:heart: youuuuu
Sun Dec 26, 2010, 10:28 AM
bdwfh
i keep forgetting that shout boxes even exist :bucktooth:
Sat Oct 30, 2010, 9:45 PM
psion005:iconpsion005:
Me--->:alien::abduction:<---You
Wed May 19, 2010, 9:45 PM
nightwibe:iconnightwibe:
:la:
Tue Oct 13, 2009, 12:16 PM
Nobody

Artistes I've Shot

Paramore | The Swellers | Nubian Gents/Feminine Fire | Andrew Yeo | New Life Worship | Henry Seeley | Parachute Band | Frank Gambale | Buddy Guy | Copeland | Opshop | The Fray | Amateur Takes Control | Plainsunset | The Fire Fight | Planetshakers | Don Moen | ShiGGaShay | The Great Spy Experiment | The Bois | Mocca | For This Cycle | King Kong Jane | Black Diamond Folds | Godzilla | Carlos Castano | Rudra | Obedient Wives Club | ANECHOIS | Embrace Them Ghosts | Cashew Chemists | PLOT | Copy Machine | A Town In Fear | Love Me Butch | Urbandub | In Each Hand A Cutlass | King Ly Chee | Inch Chua & The Metric System | Chicago | Sigur Ros | Jennifer Lopez | The Sam Willows | Skarf | M.I.B | Taufik Batisah | Jay Park | The Ataris | Yeah Yeah Yeahs | Band of Horses | Vampire Weekend | Bonnie Raitt | Kara Grainger | Robert Plant & The Sensational Space Shifters | Rufus Wainwright | Paul Simon | Jimmy Cliff | The Script | Matchbox Twenty

Aritstes I want to shoot

Lifehouse | Brooke Fraser | Nightwish| Fightstar | Flyleaf | Foo Fighters | The Rescues | Switchfoot | Amaranthe | Coldplay | The Killers | Metallica | Taylor Swift

Donate

Timothy-Sim has started a donation pool!
901 / 20,000
Anything and everything!

You must be logged in to donate.
  • :iconrhynwilliams:
    RhynWilliams
    Donated Apr 2, 2015, 8:19:48 AM
    50
  • :iconjamminjo:
    JamminJo
    Donated Sep 28, 2011, 12:14:44 PM
    300
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Deviant
    Donated Sep 28, 2011, 2:29:32 AM
    20
  • :iconsezmeralda:
    sezmeralda
    Donated Sep 1, 2011, 8:15:44 AM
    50
  • :iconandaelentari:
    Andaelentari
    Donated Jul 25, 2011, 9:06:22 AM
    20
  • :iconnesmaty:
    Nesmaty
    Donated Feb 12, 2011, 9:11:58 AM
    50
  • :iconvalentinedemostene:
    ValentineDemostene
    Donated Jan 30, 2011, 11:45:51 PM
    30
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Deviant
    Donated Jan 3, 2011, 9:17:36 PM
    20
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Deviant
    Donated Dec 31, 2010, 6:35:15 AM
    20
  • :iconbrizzbrainmeister:
    BrizzbrainMeister
    Donated Dec 24, 2010, 12:07:40 AM
    38

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:iconafricanobserver:
AfricanObserver Featured By Owner May 17, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
:bow:
Thank you.
Reply
:icontimothy-sim:
Timothy-Sim Featured By Owner May 18, 2015  Professional Photographer
:)
Reply
:iconlexi247:
Lexi247 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2015
Just stopping by to say hello :hug: Have a wonderful day~!
Reply
:icontimothy-sim:
Timothy-Sim Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2015  Professional Photographer
Thank you! And you too :)
Reply
:iconhosagu:
hosagu Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
So glad to discover you and your work...! :heart:
Reply
Add a Comment: